Opening June 14, 2021, Auschwitz: Not long ago. Not far away. brings together more than 700 original objects and 400 photographs from over 20 institutions and museums around the world.

See below for full list of speakers and public programs.

The Midwest Center for Holocaust Education and Union Station Kansas City are pleased to present the following educational programs associated with the exhibition Auschwitz: Not long ago. Not far away.

Fran Sternberg – Visualizing Genocide: The Auschwitz Album and the Process of Destruction

April 15, 2021 at 6:30 pm via Zoom

The Auschwitz Album is the only collection of photographs known to show the arrival and selection process at a death camp. This presentation explores the Auschwitz Album and what it reveals about the Nazi process of destruction.



Dr. Sternberg is affiliated with the University of Kansas Jewish Studies Program, where she teaches a range of Jewish history courses – among them, modern Jewish History, medieval and early modern Jewry, the Holocaust, Hitler and Nazi Germany and the history of Jewish women.  Her research and areas of interest include 19th and 20th century East European Jewry, interwar Polish Jewry, the shtetl, antisemitism, and the Holocaust.

Presented by the Midwest Center for Holocaust Education and Union Station Kansas City in support of the exhibition Auschwitz: Not long ago. Not far away.

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Perspectives on Liberation – A Panel

May 18, 2021 at 6:30 via Zoom

This panel discussion explores the perspectives of survivors, liberators, the military command staff, and President Truman on liberation and the immediate aftermath of the Holocaust.

Panelist are: Jessica Rockhold, Midwest Center for Holocaust Education; Jeff Nelson, Eisenhower Presidential Library and Museum; Mark Adams, Truman Presidential Library and Museum.

Presented by the Midwest Center for Holocaust Education and Union Station Kansas City, in partnership with the Eisenhower Presidential Library and Museum and Truman Presidential Library and Museum, in support of the exhibition Auschwitz: Not long ago. Not far away.

REGISTER FOR LIBERATION PANEL
Tim Cole – Holocaust Landscapes

June 22 at 2:00 pm via Zoom

Camps like Auschwitz were only one of the many landscapes where the Holocaust was enacted and experienced. In this talk Dr. Cole situates the place of Auschwitz within the wider geography and chronology of a genocide that was constantly on the move as it first moved east, and then west, and then east again across Europe.

Dr. Cole is Professor of Social History and Director of Brigstow Institute, University of Bristol. His core research has focused on Holocaust landscapes – both historical and memory landscapes – writing books on Holocaust representation (Images of the Holocaust/Selling the Holocaust, 1999), the spatiality of ghettorization in Budapest (Holocaust City, 2003), social histories of the Hungarian Holocaust (Traces of the Holocaust, 2011) and the spatiality of survival (Holocaust Landscapes, 2016).

Presented by the Midwest Center for Holocaust Education and Union Station Kansas City in support of the exhibition Auschwitz: Not long ago. Not far away.

REGISTER FOR HOLOCAUST LANDSCAPES
Andrew Bergerson – Collapsing Democracy, Rising Fascism

July 8, 2021 at 6:30 pm via Zoom

Dr. Bergerson a professor of History and Public Humanities at the University of Missouri, Kansas City. He is a historian of modern Germany with particular interest in the history of everyday life (Alltagsgeschichte), ethnographic/oral history, interdisciplinary German studies, and the public humanities. He teaches a range of courses on modern German, modern European, and modern global history. He has authored or coauthored various monographs including: Ordinary Germans in Extraordinary Times,  The Happy Burden of History, and Ruptures in the Everyday.

Presented by the Midwest Center for Holocaust Education and Union Station Kansas City in support of the exhibition Auschwitz: Not long ago. Not far away.

REGISTER FOR COLLAPSING DEMOCRACY, RISING FASCISM
Fran Sternberg – Prewar European Jewry

July 20 2021 at 6:30 via Zoom

Dr. Sternberg is affiliated with the University of Kansas Jewish Studies Program, where she teaches a range of Jewish history courses – among them, modern Jewish History, medieval and early modern Jewry, the Holocaust, Hitler and Nazi Germany and the history of Jewish women.  Her research and areas of interest include 19th and 20th century East European Jewry, interwar Polish Jewry, the shtetl, antisemitism, and the Holocaust.

Presented by the Midwest Center for Holocaust Education and Union Station Kansas City in support of the exhibition Auschwitz: Not long ago. Not far away.

REGISTER FOR PREWAR EUROPEAN JEWRY
Gerhard Baumgartner – The Roma Experience of the Holocaust

August 2, 2021 at 2:00 pm via Zoom

Dr. Baumgartner is Director of the Documentation Centre of the Austrian Resistance.

Presented by the Midwest Center for Holocaust Education and Union Station Kansas City in support of the exhibition Auschwitz: Not long ago. Not far away.

REGISTER FOR THE ROMA EXPERIENCE OF THE HOLOCAUST
Anna Hájková – Terezin & Deportations from the West

August 24, 2021 at 2:00 pm via Zoom

Terezín was operated by the Nazis between November 1941 and May 1945 as a transit ghetto for Central and Western European Jews before their deportation for murder in the East. The Last Ghetto offers both a modern history of this Central European ghetto and the first in-depth analytical history of a prison society during the Holocaust. During the three and a half years of the camp’s existence, prisoners created their own culture and habits, bonded, fell in love, and forged new families. Based on extensive archival research in nine languages and on empathetic reading of victim testimonies, The Last Ghetto casts light on human society works in extremis.

Dr. Anna Hájková, Associate Professor of Modern Continental European History, University of Warwick, is the author of  The Last Ghetto: An Everyday History of Theresienstadt. Awarded the Irma Rosenberg and Herbert Steiner Prizes, the book focuses on the everyday history of the Holocaust, using the Terezín transit ghetto as a springboard to examine larger issues of human behavior under extreme stress. Her work examines the society in the camps, Jewish social and political elites, issues of nationalism and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, and the Jewish Councils.

Presented by the Midwest Center for Holocaust Education and Union Station Kansas City in support of the exhibition Auschwitz: Not long ago. Not far away.

REGISTER FOR TEREZIN AND DEPORTATIONS FROM THE WEST
David Marwell – Mengele: Unmasking the “Angel of Death”

September 1, 2021 at 6:30 at Union Station Kansas City

Historian David G. Marwell will talk about his recent book on Josef Mengele, in which he strips away the myths that have attached themselves to the Auschwitz doctor and replaces what is a frightening caricature with an perhaps even more unsettling picture of the human being that he was.


Dr. Marwell has had a distinguished career in public history. He spent nine years at the US Department of Justice, where, as Chief of Investigative Research, he conducted research in support of the investigation and prosecution of Nazi war criminals in the United States. As a part of this effort, he played major roles in the Klaus Barbie and Josef Mengele investigations and helped to author the two major reports that resulted. In 2000, Marwell was appointed Director & CEO of the Museum of Jewish Heritage in New York City. He is the author of MENGLE: Unmasking the Angel of Death.

Presented by the Midwest Center for Holocaust Education and Union Station Kansas City in support of the exhibition Auschwitz: Not long ago. Not far away.

Beth Griech-Polelle – Hitler’s First Victims: The Nazi Forced Sterilization Program and the Euthanasia Project

September 13, 2021 at 6:30 pm via Zoom

When Hitler became Chancellor of Germany in 1933, eugenicists welcomed his appointment. Many in the eugenics community believed that Hitler would be the one to put their theories into real practice to “cleanse” the population of Germany. They were correct. Moving first against those deemed to be “unhealthy” and “unfit” to be members of the People’s Community, the Nazi regime began forced sterilizations. By 1939, Hitler was ready to move to eliminate the mentally ill and physically disabled in what came to be called the “Euthanasia” Project. Learning about the “Euthanasia” Project is critical to understanding the evolution of Nazi killing methods.

Dr. Griech-Polelle is Kurt Mayer Chair of Holocaust Studies, Pacific Lutheran University. She is the author of Anti-Semitism and the Holocaust: Language, Rhetoric and the Traditions of Hatred, Trajectories of Memory: Intergenerational Representations of the Holocaust in History and the Arts, The Nuremberg War Crimes Trial and its Policy Consequences Today, Bishop von Galen: German Catholicism and National Socialism.

Presented by the Midwest Center for Holocaust Education and Union Station Kansas City in support of the exhibition Auschwitz: Not long ago. Not far away.

REGISTER FOR HITLER'S FIRST VICTIMS
Non-Jewish Victims of the Holocaust: A Panel

September 14, 2021 at 2:00 via Zoom

Nearly 5 million non-Jews were murdered in the course of the Holocaust. This panel will explore the experiences of three of those victim groups – the Roma, queer victims, and the mentally and physically disabled. Gerhard Baumgartner, William Spurlin, and Beth Griech-Pollele will fill this panel and each will give an individual presentation on a separate date.

Presented by the Midwest Center for Holocaust Education and Union Station Kansas City in support of the exhibition Auschwitz: Not long ago. Not far away.

REGISTER FOR NON-JEWISH VICTIMS OF THE HOLOCAUST: A PANEL
Shelly Cline – Belzec to Auschwitz

Sept. 23, 2021 at 6:30 at Union Station Kansas City

Dr. Shelly Cline is the historian and Director of Education at the Midwest Center for Holocaust Education.

Presented by the Midwest Center for Holocaust Education and Union Station Kansas City in support of the exhibition Auschwitz: Not long ago. Not far away.

Holly Huffnagle – 75 Years After Auschwitz: Antisemitism in America

October 4, 2021 at 6:30 at Union Station Kansas City

More than 75 years after the Holocaust, antisemitism is again on the rise in Europe. But it is also increasing here in the United States. After the recent killings in Pittsburgh, Poway, Jersey City, Monsey, and the continuous attacks against Jews in Brooklyn, the American Jewish community is worried.  Nearly nine out of ten American Jews believe antisemitism is a problem in the U.S. today, and more than eight in ten believe it has increased over the last five years. And yet nearly half of U.S. adults, are not familiar with the term ‘antisemitism,’and even once the term was explained, 53% of Americans believe antisemitism has stayed the same or decreased in the past five years—the opposite of what the data shows.

How do we push back against antisemitism and other forms of hate and intolerance when the broader society is ignorant? Why is combating antisemitism also a problem for non-Jews? And how do we work together to lower the levels of antisemitism in America? This presentation is a timely conversation to address these pertinent questions.


Holly Huffnagle serves as AJC’s U.S. Director for Combating Antisemitism, spearheading the agency’s response to antisemitism in the United States and its efforts to better protect the Jewish community.

Presented by the Midwest Center for Holocaust Education and Union Station Kansas City in support of the exhibition Auschwitz: Not long ago. Not far away. in partnership with Jewish Community Relations Bureau/AJC.

William Spurlin – Queer Victims of the Holocaust

Oct. 12, 2021 at 6:30 via Zoom

Professor Spurlin is Professor of English and Vice-Dean/Education in the College of Business, Arts & Social Sciences, Brunel University London. He has written extensively on the politics of gender and sexual dissidence and is widely known for his work in queer studies. His monograph, Lost Intimacies: Rethinking Homosexuality under National Socialism (2009), uses queer theory to read against the grain of hetero-textual narratives of the Holocaust and as a way for locating sexuality at its intersections with race, gender, and eugenics within the National Socialist imaginary.  His book also challenges prevailing assumptions in the received scholarship that lesbians were not as systematically persecuted by the Nazis.

Presented by the Midwest Center for Holocaust Education and Union Station Kansas City in support of the exhibition Auschwitz: Not long ago. Not far away.

REGISTER FOR QUEER VICTIMS OF THE HOLOCAUST
Sam Kassow – Times Capsules Under the Rubble: the Ringelblum Archive in the Warsaw Ghetto

Oct. 26, 2021 at 6:30 pm at Union Station Kansas City

During World War II Jews resisted not only with guns but also with pen and paper. Even in the face of death they left “time capsules” full of documents that they buried under the rubble of ghettos and death camps. They were determined that posterity would remember them on the basis of Jewish and not German sources. The Ringelblum archive in the Warsaw Ghetto buried thousands of documents. But of the 60 people who worked on this national mission, only three survived. This will be their story.​

Dr. Samuel Kassow is Charles Northam Professor of History, Trinity College and author of Who Will Write Our History: Emanuel Ringelblum, the Warsaw Ghetto, and the Oyneg Shabes Archives (Indiana University Press, 2007). He served as a consultant for the documentary film version of Who Will Write Our History. He is the author of The Clandestine History of the Kovno Jewish Ghetto Police.

Presented by the Midwest Center for Holocaust Education and Union Station Kansas City in support of the exhibition Auschwitz: Not long ago. Not far away.

Lawrence Douglas – From Nuremberg to Demjanjuk: Justice and the Trials of the Holocaust – Annual Kristallnacht Commemoration

November 9, 2021 at 6:30 at Union Station Kansas City

This talk explores the era of the great trials of the Holocaust, beginning 75 years ago at Nuremberg and ending a decade ago with the conviction of John (Ivan) Demjanjuk in Munich. Professor Douglas will consider the aims and limitations of criminal justice when dealing with crimes of genocidal sweep.

Professor Douglas is James J. Grosfeld Professor of Law, Jurisprudence & Social Thought (LJST), Amherst College and is the author of seven books, including The Memory of Judgment: Making Law and History in the Trials of the Holocaust (Yale, 2001) and The Right Wrong Man: John Demjanjuk and the Last Great Nazi War Crimes Trial (Princeton, 2016), a New York Times “Editor’s Choice.” The recipient of major fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, the Institute for International Education, and American Academy in Berlin, and the Carnegie Foundation, Douglas has lectured throughout the United States and in more than a dozen countries, and has served as visiting professor at the University of London and Humboldt Universität zu Berlin.

Presented by the Midwest Center for Holocaust Education and Union Station Kansas City in support of the exhibition Auschwitz: Not long ago. Not far away. in partnership with the Truman Presidential Library and Museum.

Caroline Sturdy Colls – Archaeology of the Holocaust: Treblinka and Bergen-Belsen

November 18, 2021 at 2:00 pm via Zoom

Dr. Sturdy Colls will present on her research as an archaeologist at the sites of Treblinka and Bergen-Belsen.

Presented by the Midwest Center for Holocaust Education and Union Station Kansas City in support of the exhibition Auschwitz: Not long ago. Not far away.

REGISTER FOR ARCHAEOLOGY OF THE HOLOCAUST: TREBLINKA AND BERGEN-BELSEN
Our Mothers Were in Auschwitz – Three Daughters Remember

December 1, 2021 at 6:30 pm at Union Station Kansas City

Members of MCHE’s Second Generation Speakers Bureau Alice Jacks Achtenberg, Regina Kort and Matilda Rosenberg share the experiences of their mothers Bronia Roslawowski, Sonia Warshawski, and Alegre Tevet.

Presented by the Midwest Center for Holocaust Education and Union Station Kansas City in support of the exhibition Auschwitz: Not long ago. Not far away.

Robert Jan van Pelt – Auschwitz

January 24, 2021 at 6:30 at Union Station Kansas City

Dr. Robert Jan van Pelt is one of the world’s leading experts on Auschwitz. He co-authored the award winning book, Auschwitz 1270 to the Present, with Dr. Debórah Dwork, and initiated and chaired the workgroup that created the master plan for the future of the Auschwitz museum. Dr. Van Pelt was one of the four internationally renowned historians who served as expert witnesses for the defense in the Irving-Lipstadt trial.

Presented by the Midwest Center for Holocaust Education and Union Station Kansas City in support of the exhibition Auschwitz: Not long ago. Not far away.

Paul Salmons

Date and Time to be announced

Paul Salmons is consultant to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and Chief Curator of ‘Seeing Auschwitz’, an exhibition by Musealia for the United Nations and UNESCO. Being an independent curator and educator specializing in difficult histories, Salmons helped create the United Kingdom’s national Holocaust Exhibition at the Imperial War Museum; co-founded the Centre for Holocaust Education at University College London; and played a leading role in the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance, an inter-governmental body of more than 30 states. He is also one of the curators of Auschwitz: Not long ago, not far away.

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